Fire Isn’t Hot?

There are many new trends wanting desperately to take a grip on the collective consciousness. They make claims that amount to nothing more than denial of the obvious.

Denying what is objectively quantifiable is an exercise of confusion. If the point of the argument is to prove the dazed quality of the one making the argument, then the argument is successful. Otherwise, there is no point in chasing the abstract ideas of the bumfuzzled few.

It won’t be long until they’re trying to convince everyone, “Fire isn’t hot.”

One of the first reasons we humans had of identifying things we might call “fire”, and things which are “hot”, was to keep people safe. We made the definitions and slapped the labels down on the items most likely to hurt, harm, and burn.

It’s not likely the reason for the invention of the words was to confuse the genetically obtuse of a later day. The reason was the same for the dazed and confused as it was for the average citizen and the obscenely intelligent: so they could know before irreversible harm was done.

Why would anyone want to try to organize the language in a confusing way? If it was reorganized for the confused few, would it be less confusing to them? Of course not. Those who want to deny the obvious will only continue to rue the reality that surrounds them.

Don’t worry, though. These trends will die and others will take their place. Like a flame fades, turns the fire’s fuel to smoke and ashes, so will the new trends fade.

Published by Kurt Gailey

This is where I'm supposed to brag about how I've written seven novels, five screenplays, thousands of short stories, four self-help books, and one children's early-reader, but I'd rather stay humble. You can find out about things I've written or follow my barchive (web archive, aka 'blog) at xenosthesia.com or follow me on twitter @kurt_gailey. I love sports and music and books, so if you're an athlete or in a band or you're a writer, give me a follow and I'll most likely follow you back. I've even been known to promote other people's projects.

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: